Denis Mukwege is a renowned Congolese gynecological surgeon and Nobel Peace Prize nominee. Dr. Mukwege is the founder and director of the Panzi Hospital, which treats victims of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Dr. Mukwege is a firm advocate for the rights of women in DRC and has addressed the UN General Assembly on this issue. Dr. Mukwege is also on the advisory committee for the International Campaign to Stop Rape and Gender Violence in Conflict. He has been the recipient of numerous international awards for his work with survivors of rape and for his advocacy against sexual violence as a weapon of war. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in both 2009 and 2013, and was awarded the UN Human Rights Prize in 2008 and the Clinton Global Citizen Award in 2011.

The following excerpt was taken from an interview between Denis Mukwege and Columbia University’s Journal of International Affairs. Permission to republish granted by the Journal of International Affairs.

Journal of International Affairs, Fall/Winter 2013, Vol. 67, No. 1.

Marysia Zalewski is Director of the Centre for Gender Studies at the University of Aberdeen. She has published widely on feminist theory, gender and international relations. She is currently completing a monograph on the relationship between feminism and international relations. A selection of her books written or co-edited include Rethinking the Man Question: Sex, Gender and Violence in International Relations (Zed Books, 2008), International Theory: Positivism and Beyond (Cambridge University Press, 1996), The "Man" Question in International Relations (Westview Press, 1998), Feminism after Postmodernism: Theorising Through Practice (Routledge, 2000).

The following excerpt was taken from an interview between Marysia Zalewski and Theory Talks, an interactive forum for discussion of debates in International Relations with an emphasis of the underlying theoretical issues. Permission to republish granted under Creative Commons License/Theory Talk.
Theory Talk #28: “Marysia Zalewski on Unsettling IR, Masculinity and Making IR Theory Interesting (again).” Thursday, April 16, 2009. Accessible at: http://www.theory-talks.org/2009/04/theory-talk-28.html

J. Ann Tickner is Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the American University. She is also a Professor Emerita at the University of Southern California where she taught for fifteen years before coming to American University. Her principal areas of teaching and research include international theory, peace and security, and feminist approaches to international relations. She served as President of the International Studies Association from 2006-2007. Her books include Gendering World Politics: Issues and Approaches in the Post-Cold War Era (Columbia University Press, 2001), Gender in International Relations: Feminist Perspectives on Achieving International Security (Columbia University Press, 1992), and Self-Reliance Versus Power Politics: American and Indian Experiences in Building Nation-States (Columbia University Press, 1987).

The following excerpt was taken from an interview between J. Ann Tickner and Theory Talks, an interactive forum for discussion of debates in International Relations with an emphasis of the underlying theoretical issues. Permission to republish granted under Creative Commons License/Theory Talk.

Theory Talk #54: “Ann Tickner on Feminist Philosophy of Science, Engaging the Mainstream, and (still) Remaining Critical in/of IR.” Monday, April 22, 2013. Accessible at: http://www.theory-talks.org/2013/04/theory-talk-54.html

Swanee Hunt is the Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer in Public Policy, founder of the Women and Public Policy Program, senior fellow at the Center for Public Leadership, and senior adviser at the Carr Center for Human Rights, all at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She is also the founder of Hunt Alternatives Fund, which advances innovative and inclusive approaches to social change at local, national, and global levels. From 1993 to 1997, Hunt served as President Clinton’s ambassador to Austria, where she hosted negotiations and international symposia to stabilize the Balkan states. She subsequently created and currently chairs the Washington-based Institute for Inclusive Security, which consults with countries worldwide and conducts advocacy, training, and research to integrate women leaders into peace processes. Ambassador Hunt holds a doctorate in theology and has been awarded seven honorary degrees.

The following excerpt was taken from an interview between Ambassador Swanee Hunt and Columbia University’s Journal of International Affairs. Permission to republish granted by the Journal of International Affairs.

Journal of International Affairs, Fall/Winter 2013, Vol. 67, No. 1.

Jamal Benomar is Special Adviser to the UN Secretary-General and has served as the UN envoy to Yemen since April 2011. He was the director of Rule of Law in the Office of the Secretary-General and interim director of the Peace Building Support Office. He served as the Chef de Cabinet of the President of the General Assembly and Special Adviser at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for several years. In November 2011, Dr. Benomar acted as the UN mediator in the negotiations that led to the signing in Riyadh of the agreement on the Yemeni transition. He has authored numerous publications dealing with governance, rule of law, constitution-making, and peace-building issues. His academic background is in international law, economics, and political science. He studied in Morocco and at the Sorbonne in Paris and completed his Phd at the University of London.

The following excerpt was taken from an interview between Jamal Benomar and Columbia University’s Journal of International Affairs. Permission to republish granted by the Journal of International Affairs.

Journal of International Affairs, Fall/Winter 2013, Vol. 67, No. 1.

Madeleine Albright is one of America’s leading authorities on foreign affairs. Unanimously confirmed as the first female Secretary of State in 1997, she became the highest-ranking woman in U.S. government history. During her four-year tenure, Albright reinforced U.S. alliances, advocated for democracy and human rights, and promoted American trade, business, labor and environmental standards abroad. Since then, Albright has continued her distinguished career as a businesswoman, political adviser and professor. She is chair of Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy firm, and Albright Capital Management LLC, an investment advisory firm focused on emerging markets. Albright also chairs the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and the Pew Global Attitudes Project and serves on the boards of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Institute and the Center for a New American Security. In this 2010 TED talk, Albright talks bluntly about politics and diplomacy, making the case that women's issues deserve a place at the center of foreign policy. Far from being a "soft" issue, she says, women's issues are often the very hardest ones, dealing directly with life and death.

Shaharzad Akbar is a member of the Central Council of Afghanistan 1400, a civic-political organization, and partner and Chief Operating Officer at QARA Consulting, Inc. in Kabul, Afghanistan. Ms. Akbar was the first elected chair-person of Afghanistan 1400, holding the position from July 2012 to July 2013. Ms. Akbar also has extensive media and development work experience in Afghanistan. She has worked as a local reporter for BBC News in Afghanistan, producer and host of a youth talk show on Radio Killid, and writer and editor for several Afghan magazines and newspapers. In 2009, Ms. Akbar worked as a senior analyst and reporter for the principal domestic elections observers group in Afghanistan. She has also played a lead role in organizin g several national conferences and events, most significantly the Pak-Afghan Joint Peace Jirga in 2007. She studied anthropology at Smith College and completed an MPhil in Development Studies at the University of Oxford as a Weidenfeld Scholar.

The following excerpt was taken from an interview between Shaharzad Akbar and Columbia University’s Journal of International Affairs in 2013. Permission to republish granted by the Journal of International Affairs.

Journal of International Affairs, Fall/Winter 2013, Vol. 67, No. 1.