Karimi, Pamela. "Home as a Locus of "Gendered" Consumption." Article written specifically for Zannegaar Journal (2014).

Pamela Karimi is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. She earned her doctorate in the history and theory of art and architecture from MIT in 2009. She is the author of Domesticity and Consumer Culture in Iran: Interior Revolutions of the Modern Era (Routledge, 2013), and co-editor of a special journal volume, Images of the Child and Childhood in Modern Muslim Contexts (Duke University Press, 2012).

Betty Friedan (1921-2006) was a prominent writer, activist, and leading figure in the women’s movement in the United States. Her book, The Feminine Mystique (1963), is often cited as sparking the second wave of American feminism in the twentieth century. She founded and was elected as the first president of the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966, which promoted full equality between men and women. After stepping down as NOW’s president in 1970, Friedan went on to organize the nationwide Women’s Strike for Equality, which attracted over 50,000 women and men and worked to significantly broadened the feminist movement. Regarded as one of the most influential authors and intellectuals of her time, Friedan remained active in politics and advocacy throughout her life, and authored six books.

Auslander, Leora. “The Gendering of Consumer Practices in Nineteenth-Century France.” The Sex of Things: Gender and Consumption in Historical Perspective. Eds. Victoria de Grazia and Ellen Furlough. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996. 79-112. Copyright, 1996, University of California Press. All rights reserved. Republished by permission of the copyright holder, University of California Press. www.ucpress.edu.

Leora Auslander is an American historian, best known for being Professor of European Social History at the University of Chicago. Auslander received her doctorate in History from Brown University. She joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1987, where she served as the Founding Director of the Center for Gender Studies from 1996 to 1999. She has also held prestigious fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Auslander’s work focuses on the history of France and Germany, with a particular emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth century social history, material culture and consumption, and gender history and theory.

Baydar, Gülsüm. “Room for a Newlywed Woman.” Journal of Architectural Education 60:3 (2007): 3-11. Copyright, 2007, Taylor & Francis. All rights reserved. Republished by permission of the copyright holder, Taylor & Francis. www.taylorandfrancis.com

Gülsüm Baydar is Professor of Architecture at Yaşar University, having previously served as Professor and Chair in the Architecture Department Izmir University of Economics and at Bilkent University. She received her doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley, and specializes in spatial practices, history and theory of modern architecture, and sexuality and gender studies.

Amin, Camron Michael. “Importing “Beauty Culture” into Iran in the 1920s and 1930s: Mass Marketing Individualism in an Age of Anti-Imperialist Sacrifice.” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the MIddle East 24:1 (2004): 18-35. Copyright, 2004, Duke University Press. All rights reserved. Republished by permission of the copyright holder, Duke University Press. www.dukeupress.edu

Camron Michael Amin is Associate Professor of History at The University of Michigan-Dearborn. He received his doctorate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at The University of Chicago. His current research projects focus on higher education, journalism, and globalization in Iran.

Pollard, Lisa. “Table Talk: The Home Economics of Nationhood.” Nurturing the Nation: The Family Politics of Modernizing, Colonizing, and Liberating Egypt, 1805-1923. Ed. Idem. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. 132-165. Copyright, 1996, University of California Press. All rights reserved. Republished by permission of the copyright holder, University of California Press. www.ucpress.edu.

Lisa Pollard is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where she is also a member of the Middle East Studies and Women’s Studies Faculties. She received her doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley, where she focused on the history of the modern Middle East, the history of modern imperialism and colonialism, and modern Arabic literature. Her current research considers changes in the Egyptian family between the revolutions of 1919 and 1952, the period during which Egypt made its transition from colonialism to independence.

Karimi, Pamela. “Dwelling, Dispute, and the Space of Modern Iran.” Governing by Design: Architecture and Crisis from Modernization to Sustainability. Eds. Arindam Dutta, Daniel Abramson, and Timothy Hyde. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012. 119-146. Republished by permission of the copyright holder, University of Pittsburgh Press. www.upress.pitt.edu

Pamela Karimi is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. She earned her doctorate in the history and theory of art and architecture from MIT in 2009. She is the author of Domesticity and Consumer Culture in Iran: Interior Revolutions of the Modern Era (Routledge, 2013), and co-editor of a special journal volume, Images of the Child and Childhood in Modern Muslim Contexts (Duke University Press, 2012).

Joseph, Suad. “The Public/Private: The Imagined Boundary in the Imagined Nation/State/Community: The Lebanese Case.” Feminist Review 57 (1997): 73-92. Copyright, 1997, Palgrave Macmillan. All rights reserved. Republished by permission of the copyright holder, Palgrave Macmillan. www.palgrave.com

Suad Joseph is Professor of Anthropology and Women and Gender Studies at the University of California, Davis and current President of the Middle East Studies Association of North America. She received her doctorate in Anthropology from Columbia University in 1975. Much of Joseph’s research focuses on the sociology of the family and selfhood, citizenship, and the state in the Middle East, with a focus on her native Lebanon.